Member of The Internet Defense League Two-Way Monologues

we-are-star-stuff:

The oceans are truly an alien planet right here on Earth. Water covers 71% (and rising) of the Earth’s surface. The oceans contain 99% of the living space on the planet and 97% of the Earth’s water. Less than 1% is fresh water, and 2-3% is contained in glaciers and ice caps (and is decreasing).

Throughout history, the ocean has been a vital source of sustenance, transport, commerce, growth, and inspiration. Yet for all of our reliance on the ocean, 95 percent of this realm remains unexplored.

We didn’t send divers down to explore the Mid-Ocean Ridge until 1973 - four years after Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin walked on the moon. In fact, we have better maps of Mars than we do of the ocean floor.

The reason behind the less knowledge humans have about oceans in comparison to the space is the fact that oceans are much more difficult to explore. The deep sea is an environment completely unfriendly to humankind.

The deepest recorded oceanic trenches measure to date is the Mariana Trench, near the Philippines, in the Pacific Ocean at 10,924 m (35,838 ft). At such depths water pressure is extreme - at the very  bottom you would have something like 16,000 pounds of pressure on every square inch of your body, the equivalent of one person trying to support 50 jumbo jets - which makes creating machines to go that far down tough and probably very costly. Challenger deep floor also features hot hydrothermal vents with temperatures reaching up to 867°F (464°C). The venting fluid is highly acidic, while the water from the deep ocean is slightly basic.

Given that photons (light) can’t penetrate more than 3300 feet below the water’s surface, most of our planet is in a perpetual state of darkness.

At any given depth, the temperature is practically unvarying over long periods of time. There are no seasonal temperature changes, nor are there any annual changes. No other habitat on earth has such a constant temperature.

The oceans are so vast and deep that millions of potential new species have yet to be discovered. It is estimated that there are as little as 2 million to as many as 50 million more species that have not yet been found and/or have been incorrectly classified. Little or no light penetrates the deep part of the ocean and most of the organisms that live there rely for subsistence on falling organic matter produced in the photic zone. But life still exists.

Until recent years, the scientific community lacked detailed information about the effects of pressure on most deep sea organisms because the specimens encountered arrived at the surface dead or dying. Their bodies are acclimated to the high pressures (hundreds of atmospheres) and the decompression is usually fatal.

There is no hope of ever establishing human habitation more than about 1000 ft  deep. The pressures are too great and no engineering or materials conceivable today would allow us to build livable-sized spaces on the deep sea floor. But maybe that’s for the best. We humans have a notorious habit of messing up life whenever we venture too close.

zygoma:

Artificial cranial deformation, head flattening, or head binding is a form of body alteration in which the skull of a human being is intentionally deformed. It is done by distorting the normal growth of a child’s skull by applying force. Flat shapes, elongated ones (produced by binding between two pieces of wood), rounded ones (binding in cloth) and conical ones are among those chosen. It is typically carried out on an infant, as the skull is most pliable at this time. In a typical case, headbinding begins approximately a month after birth and continues for about six months. [wiki]

zygoma:

Artificial cranial deformation, head flattening, or head binding is a form of body alteration in which the skull of a human being is intentionally deformed. It is done by distorting the normal growth of a child’s skull by applying force. Flat shapes, elongated ones (produced by binding between two pieces of wood), rounded ones (binding in cloth) and conical ones are among those chosen. It is typically carried out on an infant, as the skull is most pliable at this time. In a typical case, headbinding begins approximately a month after birth and continues for about six months. [wiki]

(via homofuck)

wired:

expose-the-light:

Ten things you may not know about stars
10) Every star you see in the night sky is bigger and brighter than our Sun Of the 5,000 or so stars brighter than magnitude 6, only a handful of very faint stars are approximately the same size and brightness of our Sun and the rest are all bigger and brighter. Of the 500 or so that are brighter than 4th magnitude (which includes essentially every star visible to the unaided eye from a urban location), all are intrinsically bigger and brighter than our Sun, many by a large percentage. Of the brightest 50 stars visible to the human eye from Earth, the least intrinsically bright is Alpha Centauri, which is still more than 1.5 times more luminous than our Sun, and cannot be easily seen from most of the Northern Hemisphere.
9) You can’t see millions of stars on a dark night Despite what you may hear in TV commercials, poems and songs, you cannot see a million stars … anywhere. There simply are not enough close enough and bright enough. On a really exceptional night, with no Moon and far from any source of lights, a person with very good eyesight may be able to see 2000-2500 stars at any one time. (Counting even this small number still would be difficult.). So the next time you hear someone claim to have seen a million stars in the sky, just appreciate it as artistic license or exuberant exaggeration – because it isn’t true!
8) Red hot and cool ice blue – NOT! We are accustomed to referring to things that are red as hot and those that are blue as cool. This is not entirely unreasonable, since a red, glowing fireplace poker is hot and ice, especially in glaciers and polar regions, can have a bluish cast. But we say that only because our everyday experience is limited. In fact, heated objects change color as their temperature changes, and red represents the lowest temperature at which a heated object can glow in visible light. As it gets hotter, the color changes to white and ultimately to blue. So the red stars you see in the sky are the “coolest” (least hot), and the blue stars are the hottest!
7) Stars are black bodies A black body is an object that absorbs 100 percent of all electromagnetic radiation (that is, light, radio waves and so on) that falls on it. A common image here is that of a brick oven with the interior painted black and the only opening a small window. All light that shines through the window is absorbed by the interior of the oven and none is reflected outside the oven. It is a perfect absorber. As it turns out, this definition of being perfect absorbers suits stars very well! However, this just says that a blackbody absorbs all the radiant energy that hits it, but does not forbid it from re-emitting the energy. In the case of a star, it absorbs all radiation that falls on it, but it also radiates back into space much more than it absorbs. Thus a star is a black body that glows with great brilliance! (An even more perfect black body is a black hole, but of course, it appears truly black, and radiates no light.)
6) There are no green stars Although there are scattered claims for stars that appear green, including Beta Librae (Zuben Eschamali), most observers do not see green in any stars except as an optical effect from their telescopes, or else an idiosyncratic quirk of personal vision and contrast. Stars emit a spectrum (“rainbow”) of colors, including green, but the human eye-brain connection mixes the colors together in a manner that rarely if ever comes out green. One color can dominate the radiation, but within the range of wavelengths and intensities found in stars, greens get mixed with other colors, and the star appears white. For stars, the general colors are, from lower to higher temperatures, red, orange, yellow, white and blue. So as far as the human eye can tell, there are no green stars.
5) The Sun is a green star That being said, the Sun is a “green” star, or more specifically, a green-blue star, whose peak wavelength lies clearly in the transition area on the spectrum between blue and green.  This is not just an idle fact, but is important because the temperature of a star is related to the color of its most predominate wavelength of emission. (Whew!) In the Sun’s case, the surface temperature is about 5,800 K, or 500 nanometers, a green-blue. However, as indicated above, when the human eye factors in the other colors around it, the Sun’s apparent color comes out a white or even a yellowish white.
4) The Sun is a “dwarf” star We are accustomed to think of the Sun as a “normal” star, and in many respects, it is. But did you know that it is a “dwarf” star? You may have heard of a “white dwarf,” but that is not a regular star at all, but the corpse of a dead star. Technically, as far as “normal” stars go (that is, astronomical objects that produce their own energy through sustained and stable hydrogen fusion), there are only “dwarfs,” “giants” and “supergiants.” The giants and supergiants represent the terminal (old age) stages of stars, but the vast majority of stars, those in the long, mature stage of evolution (Main Sequence) are all called “dwarfs.” There is quite a bit of range in size here, but they are all much smaller than the giants and supergiants. So technically, the Sun is a dwarf star, sometimes called “Yellow Dwarf” in contradiction to the entry above!
3) Stars don’t twinkle Stars appear to twinkle (“scintillate”), especially when they are near the horizon. One star, Sirius, twinkles, sparkles and flashes so much some times that people actually report it as a UFO. But in fact, the twinkling is not a property of the stars, but of Earth’s turbulent atmosphere. As the light from a star passes through the atmosphere, especially when the star appears near the horizon, it must pass through many layers of often rapidly differing density. This has the effect of deflecting the light slightly as it were a ball in a pinball machine. The light eventually gets to your eyes, but every deflection causes it to change slightly in color and intensity. The result is “twinkling.” Above the Earth’s atmosphere, stars do not twinkle.
2) You can see 20 quadrillion miles, at least On a good night, you can see about 19,000,000,000,000,000 miles, easily. That’s 19 quadrillion miles, the approximate distance to the bright star Deneb in Cygnus. which is prominent in the evening skies of Fall and Winter. Deneb is bright enough to be seen virtually anywhere in the Northern hemisphere, and in fact from almost anywhere in the inhabited world. There is another star, Eta Carina, that is a little more than twice as far away, or about 44 quadrillion miles. But Eta Carina is faint, and not well placed for observers in most of the Northern hemisphere. Those are stars, but both the Andromeda Galaxy and the Triangulum Galaxy are also visible under certain conditions, and are roughly 15 and 18 quintillion miles away! (One quintillion is 10^18!)
1) Black holes don’t “suck” Many writers frequently describe black holes as “sucking” in everything around them. And it is a common worry among the ill-informed that the so-far hypothetical “mini” black holes that may be produced by the Large Hadron Collider would suck in everything around them in an ever increasing vortex that would consume the Earth! “Say it ain’t so, Joe!” Well, I am not Shoeless Joe Jackson, but it ain’t so. In the case of the LHC, it isn’t true for a number of reasons, but black holes in general do not “suck.”
This not just a semantic distinction, but one of process and consequence as well. The word “suck” via suction, as in the way vacuum cleaners work, is not how black holes attract matter. In a vacuum cleaner, the fan produces a partial vacuum (really, just a slightly lower pressure) at the floor end of the vacuum, and regular air pressure outside, being greater, pushes the air into it, carrying along loose dirt and dust.
In the case of black holes, there is no suction involved. Instead, matter is pulled into the black hole by a very strong gravitational attraction. In one way of visualizing it, it really is a bit like falling into a hole, but not like being hoovered into it. Gravity is a fundamental force of Nature, and all matter has it. When something is pulled into a black hole, the process is more like being pulled into like a fish being reeled in by an angler, rather than being pushed along like a rafter inexorably being dragged over a waterfall.
The difference may seem trivial, but from a physical standpoint it is fundamental.
So black holes don’t suck, but they are very cool. Actually, they are cold. Very, very cold. But that’s a story for another time.

This may seem a bit tl;dr, but trust us it’s fantastic and worth a read. And hey, if you don’t want to read it - at least look at the pretty gif. Oooh, Sparkle.

wired:

expose-the-light:

Ten things you may not know about stars

10) Every star you see in the night sky is bigger and brighter than our Sun
Of the 5,000 or so stars brighter than magnitude 6, only a handful of very faint stars are approximately the same size and brightness of our Sun and the rest are all bigger and brighter. Of the 500 or so that are brighter than 4th magnitude (which includes essentially every star visible to the unaided eye from a urban location), all are intrinsically bigger and brighter than our Sun, many by a large percentage. Of the brightest 50 stars visible to the human eye from Earth, the least intrinsically bright is Alpha Centauri, which is still more than 1.5 times more luminous than our Sun, and cannot be easily seen from most of the Northern Hemisphere.

9) You can’t see millions of stars on a dark night
Despite what you may hear in TV commercials, poems and songs, you cannot see a million stars … anywhere. There simply are not enough close enough and bright enough. On a really exceptional night, with no Moon and far from any source of lights, a person with very good eyesight may be able to see 2000-2500 stars at any one time. (Counting even this small number still would be difficult.). So the next time you hear someone claim to have seen a million stars in the sky, just appreciate it as artistic license or exuberant exaggeration – because it isn’t true!

8) Red hot and cool ice blue – NOT!
We are accustomed to referring to things that are red as hot and those that are blue as cool. This is not entirely unreasonable, since a red, glowing fireplace poker is hot and ice, especially in glaciers and polar regions, can have a bluish cast. But we say that only because our everyday experience is limited. In fact, heated objects change color as their temperature changes, and red represents the lowest temperature at which a heated object can glow in visible light. As it gets hotter, the color changes to white and ultimately to blue. So the red stars you see in the sky are the “coolest” (least hot), and the blue stars are the hottest!

7) Stars are black bodies
A black body is an object that absorbs 100 percent of all electromagnetic radiation (that is, light, radio waves and so on) that falls on it. A common image here is that of a brick oven with the interior painted black and the only opening a small window. All light that shines through the window is absorbed by the interior of the oven and none is reflected outside the oven. It is a perfect absorber. As it turns out, this definition of being perfect absorbers suits stars very well! However, this just says that a blackbody absorbs all the radiant energy that hits it, but does not forbid it from re-emitting the energy. In the case of a star, it absorbs all radiation that falls on it, but it also radiates back into space much more than it absorbs. Thus a star is a black body that glows with great brilliance! (An even more perfect black body is a black hole, but of course, it appears truly black, and radiates no light.)

6) There are no green stars
Although there are scattered claims for stars that appear green, including Beta Librae (Zuben Eschamali), most observers do not see green in any stars except as an optical effect from their telescopes, or else an idiosyncratic quirk of personal vision and contrast. Stars emit a spectrum (“rainbow”) of colors, including green, but the human eye-brain connection mixes the colors together in a manner that rarely if ever comes out green. One color can dominate the radiation, but within the range of wavelengths and intensities found in stars, greens get mixed with other colors, and the star appears white. For stars, the general colors are, from lower to higher temperatures, red, orange, yellow, white and blue. So as far as the human eye can tell, there are no green stars.

5) The Sun is a green star
That being said, the Sun is a “green” star, or more specifically, a green-blue star, whose peak wavelength lies clearly in the transition area on the spectrum between blue and green.  This is not just an idle fact, but is important because the temperature of a star is related to the color of its most predominate wavelength of emission. (Whew!) In the Sun’s case, the surface temperature is about 5,800 K, or 500 nanometers, a green-blue. However, as indicated above, when the human eye factors in the other colors around it, the Sun’s apparent color comes out a white or even a yellowish white.

4) The Sun is a “dwarf” star
We are accustomed to think of the Sun as a “normal” star, and in many respects, it is. But did you know that it is a “dwarf” star? You may have heard of a “white dwarf,” but that is not a regular star at all, but the corpse of a dead star. Technically, as far as “normal” stars go (that is, astronomical objects that produce their own energy through sustained and stable hydrogen fusion), there are only “dwarfs,” “giants” and “supergiants.” The giants and supergiants represent the terminal (old age) stages of stars, but the vast majority of stars, those in the long, mature stage of evolution (Main Sequence) are all called “dwarfs.” There is quite a bit of range in size here, but they are all much smaller than the giants and supergiants. So technically, the Sun is a dwarf star, sometimes called “Yellow Dwarf” in contradiction to the entry above!

3) Stars don’t twinkle
Stars appear to twinkle (“scintillate”), especially when they are near the horizon. One star, Sirius, twinkles, sparkles and flashes so much some times that people actually report it as a UFO. But in fact, the twinkling is not a property of the stars, but of Earth’s turbulent atmosphere. As the light from a star passes through the atmosphere, especially when the star appears near the horizon, it must pass through many layers of often rapidly differing density. This has the effect of deflecting the light slightly as it were a ball in a pinball machine. The light eventually gets to your eyes, but every deflection causes it to change slightly in color and intensity. The result is “twinkling.” Above the Earth’s atmosphere, stars do not twinkle.

2) You can see 20 quadrillion miles, at least
On a good night, you can see about 19,000,000,000,000,000 miles, easily. That’s 19 quadrillion miles, the approximate distance to the bright star Deneb in Cygnus. which is prominent in the evening skies of Fall and Winter. Deneb is bright enough to be seen virtually anywhere in the Northern hemisphere, and in fact from almost anywhere in the inhabited world. There is another star, Eta Carina, that is a little more than twice as far away, or about 44 quadrillion miles. But Eta Carina is faint, and not well placed for observers in most of the Northern hemisphere. Those are stars, but both the Andromeda Galaxy and the Triangulum Galaxy are also visible under certain conditions, and are roughly 15 and 18 quintillion miles away! (One quintillion is 10^18!)

1) Black holes don’t “suck”
Many writers frequently describe black holes as “sucking” in everything around them. And it is a common worry among the ill-informed that the so-far hypothetical “mini” black holes that may be produced by the Large Hadron Collider would suck in everything around them in an ever increasing vortex that would consume the Earth! “Say it ain’t so, Joe!” Well, I am not Shoeless Joe Jackson, but it ain’t so. In the case of the LHC, it isn’t true for a number of reasons, but black holes in general do not “suck.”

This not just a semantic distinction, but one of process and consequence as well. The word “suck” via suction, as in the way vacuum cleaners work, is not how black holes attract matter. In a vacuum cleaner, the fan produces a partial vacuum (really, just a slightly lower pressure) at the floor end of the vacuum, and regular air pressure outside, being greater, pushes the air into it, carrying along loose dirt and dust.

In the case of black holes, there is no suction involved. Instead, matter is pulled into the black hole by a very strong gravitational attraction. In one way of visualizing it, it really is a bit like falling into a hole, but not like being hoovered into it. Gravity is a fundamental force of Nature, and all matter has it. When something is pulled into a black hole, the process is more like being pulled into like a fish being reeled in by an angler, rather than being pushed along like a rafter inexorably being dragged over a waterfall.

The difference may seem trivial, but from a physical standpoint it is fundamental.

So black holes don’t suck, but they are very cool. Actually, they are cold. Very, very cold. But that’s a story for another time.

This may seem a bit tl;dr, but trust us it’s fantastic and worth a read. And hey, if you don’t want to read it - at least look at the pretty gif. Oooh, Sparkle.

(via valetudo)

Paraphilia: a biomedical term used to describe sexual arousal to objects, situations, or individuals that are not part of normative stimulation and that may cause distress or serious problems for the paraphiliac.

coffee-black-egg-white:

Acousticophilia:

  • Certain sounds.

Algolagnia:

  • Pain, particularly involving an erogenous zone.

Asphyxiophilia:

  • Asphyxiation or strangulation.

Autassassinophilia:

  • Being in life threatening situations.

Chremastistophilia:

  • Being robbed or held up.

Dacryphilia:

  • Tears or crying.

Dendrophilia:

  • Trees.

Forniphilia:

  • Turning a human into a piece of furniture.

Hybristophilia:

  • People who have committed an outrageous or gruesome crime.

Katoptronophilia:

  • Having sex in front of mirrors.

Narratophilia:

  • The telling of dirty and obscene words or stories to a partner.

Pyrophilia:

  • Fire.

Sitophilia:

  • Food.

Symphorophilia:

  • Staging and watching a disaster, such as a fire or car accident.

Vorarephilia:

  • The idea of being eaten by another person or animal.

(Source: daffodil-aubade)

bayergal:

lanuminga:

luhans:

lyukai:

niktheawesome:

forzabarca:

sweetheartcrisis:


Eins, zwei, drei, vier, fünf, sechs, sieben, acht …

um, dois, três, quatro …

Un, Deux, Trois, Quatre

Un, dau…

It’s not a very good one.
uno, dos, tres, cuatro…

yksi, kaksi…

один, два…

một, hai…

I’m not sure how this works.
isa-

一、二,三、四。。。

ett två tre fyra

philippines and japan stop omg

Üks, kaks


Satu Dua Tiga Empat

Wowzers

один, двА 

one AMERICA, two AMERICA, three AMERICA…
i don’t get it either


the comments though

i died at the america one

bayergal:

lanuminga:

luhans:

lyukai:

niktheawesome:

forzabarca:

sweetheartcrisis:

Eins, zwei, drei, vier, fünf, sechs, sieben, acht …

um, dois, três, quatro …

Un, Deux, Trois, Quatre

Un, dau…

It’s not a very good one.

uno, dos, tres, cuatro…

yksi, kaksi…

один, два…

một, hai

I’m not sure how this works.

isa-

一、二,三、四。。。

ett två tre fyra

philippines and japan stop omg

Üks, kaks

Satu Dua Tiga Empat

Wowzers

один, двА
 

one AMERICA, two AMERICA, three AMERICA…

i don’t get it either

the comments though

i died at the america one

(via valetudo)

rosedewittbukaterfan:

On April 15th, 1912, 100 years ago the grandest ship in the world, the Titanic sank at 2:20 am. And 1,500 people lost their lives.

(via hotmessinawalmartdress)

To give you an idea of Tumblr’s massive scale, some quick numbers:

shortformblog:

  • 500 million page views go through Tumblr every single day
  • 40k requests added each second at Tumblr’s peak usage hours; and it’s growing, too
  • 50GB of posts added each day; follower list updates are roughly another 2.7 terabytes daily
  • 1M number of writes made through the dashboard each second, and 50,000 reads per second source

» It’s tough to scale, too: According to Blake Matheny, Tumblr’s Distributed Systems Engineer, the service’s broad distribution makes it different from many other social networks, adding complexity that can stress the servers greatly. “It’s not just one or two users that have millions of followers. The graph for Tumblr users has hundreds of followers,” he writes. “This is different than any other social network and is what makes Tumblr so challenging to scale.” Matheny says that people will go back hundreds of pages on the dashboard to read content. And the network will only grow in complexity over time — the site is growing by 30 percent each month, and requires hundreds of servers to do what it has to do. If you’re technically-inclined, read High Scalability’s entire article — it’s super-fascinating.

Read ShortFormBlogFollow

(Source: shortformblog)

This is totally legit.

This is totally legit.

(via daffodil-aubade)

"We’re all made of star dust." - Carl Sagan
I love this quote.

"We’re all made of star dust." - Carl Sagan

I love this quote.

(Source: queer-faerie, via fucknicethings)

yerawizardharry:

Why old books smell good.
“Lignin, the stuff that prevents all trees from adopting the weeping habit, is a polymer made up of units that are closely related to vanillin. When made into paper and stored for years, it breaks down and smells good. Which is how divine providence has arranged for secondhand bookstores to smell like good quality vanilla absolute, subliminally stoking a hunger for knowledge in all of us.”
— Perfumes: The A-Z Guide

yerawizardharry:

Why old books smell good.

Lignin, the stuff that prevents all trees from adopting the weeping habit, is a polymer made up of units that are closely related to vanillin. When made into paper and stored for years, it breaks down and smells good. Which is how divine providence has arranged for secondhand bookstores to smell like good quality vanilla absolute, subliminally stoking a hunger for knowledge in all of us.”

— Perfumes: The A-Z Guide

(via daffodil-aubade)

5 Bizarre Facts About Hitler

houseof1000corpses:

  • Hitler had only one testicle. This one is interesting, considering most would say Hitler had fairly large gonads. Guess it was all just a show to make up for what he was actually missing. I had a difficult time figuring out how he only came to have 1 and it seems he may have been injured during WWI and had to have it removed. Seems they amputated his conscience along with it.
  • Hitler dated, and got down with, his niece. Yes, it’s true. Geli was the daughter of Hitler’s half-sister. She was 23 at the time she committed suicide. Oh, wait. That might have been murder. But since the evidence pointed to Hitler, well, no charges were brought.
  • Hitler was one kinky Fuhrer. It is highly suspected that Hitler had unusual desires in the bedroom. Specifically, being urinated and defecated on. While this may sound like a joke, it’s been cited as probable by well-regarded historians. Believe it or not!
  • Hitler’s first love was a girl he thought to be Jewish. This could explain it all, couldn’t it? When Hitler was 16 years old he fell for a girl named Stefanie Isak. He was obsessed. As you can imagine, it didn’t work out. Adolph used to fantasize about throwing himself off a bridge in despair – and killing her too. How romantic.
  • Hitler invented the concept of the blow-up doll. Again, not a joke. Hitler wanted his soldiers to be able to have their needs met without getting involved with foreign women. So… he ordered plastic bodied femmes be created for them. Blonde hair, white skin, large breasts and lips, and whose, uh, stuff, would “feel absolutely real”.

(via)

(via houseof1000corpses-deactivated2)


A Glasgow smile (also known as a Glasgow grin, Anna grin, Chelsea grin or Chelsea smile) is a nickname for the result of cutting a victim’s face from the edges of the mouth to the ears. The cut – and the scars it leaves – form an extension of what resembles a smile. Sometimes further to hurt or even kill the victim, he or she would then be stabbed or kicked, most notably in the stomach (or in case of kicking, the groin), so that the face would be ripped apart when the victim screamed. The practice originated in the Scottish city of Glasgow, which gave it its name. It also became popular in Chelsea, London (where it is known as a “Chelsea grin”) and other areas of Britain, for gangs hoping to leave a message to rival gang members. If cut deep enough, the victim may bleed to death.
*Elizabeth Short, more famously known as the Black Dahlia was believed to be given a Glasgow smile during her murder, as when police recovered her body, her mouth was slit from side to side towards her ears.

A Glasgow smile (also known as a Glasgow grin, Anna grin, Chelsea grin or Chelsea smile) is a nickname for the result of cutting a victim’s face from the edges of the mouth to the ears. The cut – and the scars it leaves – form an extension of what resembles a smile. Sometimes further to hurt or even kill the victim, he or she would then be stabbed or kicked, most notably in the stomach (or in case of kicking, the groin), so that the face would be ripped apart when the victim screamed. The practice originated in the Scottish city of Glasgow, which gave it its name. It also became popular in Chelsea, London (where it is known as a “Chelsea grin”) and other areas of Britain, for gangs hoping to leave a message to rival gang members. If cut deep enough, the victim may bleed to death.


*Elizabeth Short, more famously known as the Black Dahlia was believed to be given a Glasgow smile during her murder, as when police recovered her body, her mouth was slit from side to side towards her ears.

(via homofuck)

houseof1000corpses:

20 Facts about Death
1 The practice of burying the dead may date back 350,000 years, as  evidenced by a 45-foot-deep pit in Atapuerca, Spain, filled with the  fossils of 27 hominids of the species Homo heidelbergensis, a possible ancestor of Neanderthals and modern humans.
2 Never say die: There are at least 200 euphemisms for death, including “to be in Abraham’s bosom,” “just add maggots,” and “sleep with the Tribbles” (a Star Trek favorite).
3 No American has died of old age since 1951.
4 That was the year the government eliminated that classification on death certificates.
5  The trigger of death, in all cases, is lack of oxygen. Its decline may  prompt muscle spasms, or the “agonal phase,” from the Greek word agon,  or contest.
6 Within three days of death, the  enzymes that once digested your dinner begin to eat you. Ruptured cells  become food for living bacteria in the gut, which release enough noxious gas to bloat the body and force the eyes to bulge outward.
7  So much for recycling: Burials in America deposit 827,060 gallons of  embalming fluid—formaldehyde, methanol, and ethanol—into the soil each  year. Cremation pumps dioxins, hydrochloric acid, sulfur dioxide, and carbon dioxide into the air.
8 Alternatively … A Swedish company, Promessa, will freeze-dry your body in liquid nitrogen,  pulverize it with high-frequency vibrations, and seal the resulting  powder in a cornstarch coffin. They claim this “ecological burial” will  decompose in 6 to 12 months.
9 Zoroastrians in India leave out the bodies of the dead to be consumed by vultures.
10  The vultures are now dying off after eating cattle carcasses dosed with  diclofenac, an anti-inflammatory used to relieve fever in livestock.
11  Queen Victoria insisted on being buried with the bathrobe of her  long-dead husband, Prince Albert, and a plaster cast of his hand.
12  If this doesn’t work, we’re trying in vitro! In Madagascar, families  dig up the bones of dead relatives and parade them around the village in  a ceremony called  famadihana. The remains are then wrapped in a new shroud and reburied.  The old shroud is given to a newly married, childless couple to cover  the connubial bed.
13 During a railway expansion in Egypt in the 19th century, construction companies unearthed so many mummies that they used them as fuel for locomotives.
14  Well, yeah, there’s a slight chance this could backfire: English  philosopher Francis Bacon, a founder of the scientific method, died in  1626 of pneumonia after stuffing a chicken with snow to see if cold  would preserve it.
15 For organs to form during  embryonic development, some cells must commit suicide. Without such  programmed cell death, we would all be born with webbed feet, like  ducks.
16 Waiting to exhale: In 1907 a Massachusetts doctor  conducted an experiment with a specially designed deathbed and reported  that the human body lost 21 grams upon dying. This has been widely held  as fact ever since. It’s not.
17 Buried alive:  In 19th-century Europe there was so much anecdotal evidence that living  people were mistakenly declared dead that cadavers were laid out in  “hospitals for the dead” while attendants awaited signs of putrefaction.
18 Eighty percent of people in the United States die in a hospital.
19 If you can’t make it here … More people commit suicide in New York City than are murdered.
20 It is estimated that 100 billion people have died since humans began.

houseof1000corpses:

20 Facts about Death

1 The practice of burying the dead may date back 350,000 years, as evidenced by a 45-foot-deep pit in Atapuerca, Spain, filled with the fossils of 27 hominids of the species Homo heidelbergensis, a possible ancestor of Neanderthals and modern humans.

2 Never say die: There are at least 200 euphemisms for death, including “to be in Abraham’s bosom,” “just add maggots,” and “sleep with the Tribbles” (a Star Trek favorite).

3 No American has died of old age since 1951.

4 That was the year the government eliminated that classification on death certificates.

5 The trigger of death, in all cases, is lack of oxygen. Its decline may prompt muscle spasms, or the “agonal phase,” from the Greek word agon, or contest.

6 Within three days of death, the enzymes that once digested your dinner begin to eat you. Ruptured cells become food for living bacteria in the gut, which release enough noxious gas to bloat the body and force the eyes to bulge outward.

7 So much for recycling: Burials in America deposit 827,060 gallons of embalming fluid—formaldehyde, methanol, and ethanol—into the soil each year. Cremation pumps dioxins, hydrochloric acid, sulfur dioxide, and carbon dioxide into the air.

8 Alternatively … A Swedish company, Promessa, will freeze-dry your body in liquid nitrogen, pulverize it with high-frequency vibrations, and seal the resulting powder in a cornstarch coffin. They claim this “ecological burial” will decompose in 6 to 12 months.

9 Zoroastrians in India leave out the bodies of the dead to be consumed by vultures.

10 The vultures are now dying off after eating cattle carcasses dosed with diclofenac, an anti-inflammatory used to relieve fever in livestock.

11 Queen Victoria insisted on being buried with the bathrobe of her long-dead husband, Prince Albert, and a plaster cast of his hand.

12 If this doesn’t work, we’re trying in vitro! In Madagascar, families dig up the bones of dead relatives and parade them around the village in a ceremony called famadihana. The remains are then wrapped in a new shroud and reburied. The old shroud is given to a newly married, childless couple to cover the connubial bed.

13 During a railway expansion in Egypt in the 19th century, construction companies unearthed so many mummies that they used them as fuel for locomotives.

14 Well, yeah, there’s a slight chance this could backfire: English philosopher Francis Bacon, a founder of the scientific method, died in 1626 of pneumonia after stuffing a chicken with snow to see if cold would preserve it.

15 For organs to form during embryonic development, some cells must commit suicide. Without such programmed cell death, we would all be born with webbed feet, like ducks.

16 Waiting to exhale: In 1907 a Massachusetts doctor conducted an experiment with a specially designed deathbed and reported that the human body lost 21 grams upon dying. This has been widely held as fact ever since. It’s not.

17 Buried alive: In 19th-century Europe there was so much anecdotal evidence that living people were mistakenly declared dead that cadavers were laid out in “hospitals for the dead” while attendants awaited signs of putrefaction.

18 Eighty percent of people in the United States die in a hospital.

19 If you can’t make it here … More people commit suicide in New York City than are murdered.

20 It is estimated that 100 billion people have died since humans began.

(via houseof1000corpses-deactivated2)

-jasmineblu:

FACT : your pupils dilate when you see the person you are attracted to.
Because the nervous system controls the muscles of the irises, the response of the nervous system to different stimuli results in involuntary pupil dilation. Another commonly cited reason the pupils dilate is in response to excitement or sexual arousal. When a person sees something or someone he finds very attractive, his eyes may dilate.

-jasmineblu:

FACT : your pupils dilate when you see the person you are attracted to.

Because the nervous system controls the muscles of the irises, the response of the nervous system to different stimuli results in involuntary pupil dilation. Another commonly cited reason the pupils dilate is in response to excitement or sexual arousal. When a person sees something or someone he finds very attractive, his eyes may dilate.

(via ingayswetrust-deactivated201101)